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22. May 2019

A Series of Reflections on the Passing of Okwui Enwezor (1963-2019) Introduced by Isabelle Graw

Extraordinarily warm-hearted, bursting with energy, always entertaining, Okwui was full of life, and it is hard to accept that he is no longer with us. It breaks my heart to think that he was denied the joy of raising his daughter, who will grow up without her father. And his untimely death puts a sudden end to a stellar career as a curator of groundbreaking exhibitions. From his unforgettable Documenta 11 (2002) with its “platforms,” which were deliberately not held in Kassel, to the superb “Postwar: Art between the Pacific and the Atlantic, 1945–1965” at the Haus der Kunst in Munich (2016–17), which spun art as a global history, it has always struck me as the defining strength of his projects that they drew direct connections between art history and the world at large. This decidedly political take on his field let him repudiate widely accepted dichotomies, such as distinctions between apparently Western and purportedly indigenous art, or between postcolonial and modernist narratives.

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22. May 2019

For Okwui Enwezor by Ulrich Wilmes

In Okwui Enwezor, the world has lost a brilliant curator and influential interpreter of our contemporary situation. The task of reviewing his work and paying tribute to his achievements is best left to those of my fellow eulogists who were his companions for longer stretches of his journey. I had the privilege of being his close associate for seven precious years, during which a professional relationship blossomed into friendship – a gift for which I feel deep gratitude.

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March 2019

Current Issue

Issue No. 113
March 2019
„Diskriminierung/Discrimination“

For the latest issue no. 113, TEXTE ZUR KUNST investigates the structures within the arts and cultural spheres where racism and discrimination are practiced, performed, and reproduced. This special issue concentrates specifically on the context of Germany, and includes discussions and texts from artists and theorists throughout the country who have dedicated special attention to current and ongoing political and social crises; specifically the challenges these crises pose for the language and terms of art criticism. How can criticism mount an appropriate response to the discrimination and injustices that pervade all levels of society?

To the table of contents

10. May 2019

For Okwui Enwezor by UTE META BAUER

It is not easy to explain in just a few sentences the significance of the loss of Okwui Enwezor. Certainly not for me personally. It is a fact I cannot internalize even now, more than a month after his much-too-early death. While his loss touches so many of the people he worked with over the last 30 years, more than anything, it is his uncompromising political voice that will be missed.

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9. May 2019

For Okwui Enwezor by Markus Müller

I had the great fortune and privilege to work with Okwui for almost 20 years in a number of different roles. He told me that we first met at the “Skulptur. Projekte in Münster 1997” exhibition. What I know for certain is that in July 1999, Rob Reynolds had the idea of doing an interview with Okwui for Feed. The interview took place a few days later, on August 4, 1999, at Thread Waxing Space in New York. As I remembered it, this was my first professional encounter with Okwui, who had been announced a year earlier as the artistic director of Documenta.

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Artists' Editions

Alicja Kwade, "Pars pro Toto", 2019

24. April 2019

Robert Ryman (1930-2019) An Obituary by Suzanne Hudson

Holding back seems like a throwback today, but there is nothing old or stymied about the innocent inventiveness of Robert Ryman’s painting. The loss of this important postwar figure was registered more quietly than some of us expected; but that is perhaps a fitting tribute to how Ryman lived, and painted. Beginnings were ends, and finding a point of departure appeared to be more important than hurried conclusions. In other words, painting, for Ryman, was a life’s work. Suzanne Hudson, a foremost expert on Ryman, weighs in on how so little, materially speaking, says so much.

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16. April 2019
Issue No. 113

COMMON GROUND Colin Lang in Conversation with Julia Grosse, Suza Husse, and Max Czollek

There is very little global reporting in the German art context, whether online or in print publications. Artists and cultural producers from outside the Western art world are typically marginalized or discussed in simplistic categories. How, then, might one initiate a novel art-critical discourse that would eschew forms of exclusion and build on discussions and knowledge by transforming them into a critical praxis? Editor-in-chief of Texte zur Kunst Colin Lang sat down with Julia Grosse of Contemporary And, Suza Husse, artistic director of District Berlin, and Max Czollek, author of the book “Desintegriert Euch!” and editorial board member of Jalta, a magazine devoted to contemporary Jewish perspectives, to discuss possible strategies in the struggle against discrimination.

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12. April 2019

An End to "this" World Denise Ferreira da Silva interviewed by Susanne Leeb and Kerstin Stakemeier

In her texts, lecture-performances, and film-collaborations, Denise Ferreira da Silva has opposed figures of thought and modes of action that are authorized by and thus ongoingly constitutive of a genealogy of Enlightenment and Western modernist thinking. In her 2007 book "Toward A Global Idea of Race", it is the “transparent I” of enlightened subjectivity that comes under attack. Though this “transparent I” has itself been criticized, especially in continental philosophies and feminist writings throughout the 20th century, Ferreira da Silva makes the claim that those criticisms hardly touched the systemic function this concept carries for racial subjugation, and that they remain insufficiently radical in their rejections. Professor Ferreira da Silva here illuminates these and other issues in conversation with the art historians/critics Kerstin Stakemeier and Susanne Leeb.

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10. April 2019

Barbara Hammer (1939-2019) An Obituary by Ada Maria Hennel

So much in today’s filmic landscape would be unthinkable without the work of Barbara Hammer,  a pioneer of the medium’s technical forms as well as its subjects. The bodies we see in a Hammer piece are never disconnected from how we see them. As we mourn the passing of this singular figure, Ada Maria Hennel offers a look back at the distance that Hammer measured for us from the void that still remains to be filled.

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TEXTE ZUR KUNST stands for controversial discussions and contributions by internationally leading writers on contemporary art and culture. Alongside ground-breaking essays, the quarterly magazine – which was founded in Cologne in 1990 by Stefan Germer (†) and Isabelle Graw and has been published, since 2000, in Berlin – offers interviews, roundtable discussions, and comprehensive reviews on art, film, music, the market, fashion, art history, theory, and cultural politics. Since 2006, the journal's entire main section has been published in both German and English. Additionally, each issue features exclusive editions by internationally renowned artists, who generously support the magazine by producing a unique series.